Thursday, December 31, 2015

That's All, Folks!

Almost 6 years ago, shortly after leaving Allot Communications, I started this blog focusing on broadband traffic management.

At that time, the leading technologies in this space were Deep Packet Inspection and Policy Management.  During the years, several other technologies and solutions took larger part in this domain -  such as signalling control, video optimization, caching and others.

The focus has shifted from limiting bandwidth hungry application such as P2P and usage-based billing to Network Neutrality, application aware charging, mobile cell congestion and value-added services.

After 3,617 posts, my job is done.

I would like to thank my loyal readers, coming from 229 countries - the top 10 (United States, Canada, Israel, India, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, South Korea and Russia) - to Guinea-Bissau, British Indian Ocean Territory, North Korea, Nauru, San Marino and Solomon Islands.

And to thank my sponsors during the years -  Qosmos, Openet, Informa, Sandvine, Allot Communications, ipoque, Developing Solutions, Comverse and DigitalRoute.

Thank you all!

Azi Ronen

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

AT&T Purchased Carrier IQ

Brian Santo reports to Light Reading that "AT&T has purchased the rights to Carrier IQ's network diagnostics software. Carrier IQ apparently no longer exists as a separate entity .. AT&T said, "We've acquired the rights to Carrier IQ's software, and some CIQ employees moved to AT&T. We use CIQ software solely to improve the customer's network and wireless service experience. This is in line with our Privacy Policy and provides a great benefit to users of our network." The company had no further comment".

Carrier IQ gave mobile carriers the ability to gauge the performance of their networks and services; for example, finding out why calls may have been dropped. But as noted, it can be used much more invasively. Exactly what data Carrier IQ's software collected and how it was used was up to the carriers, however, and none of the companies that used it then, or which may still be using it now, have ever revealed how they were using it.

Carrier IQ's diagnostics software resides on mobile handsets, but handset makers typically install it at the behest of carriers who use the data to improve network performance and customer service. Several US carriers relied on Carrier IQ's product, but at least one (Sprint) ceased using it several years ago after its capabilities raised concerns over possible invasions of privacy. Those concerns led to a series of class-action lawsuits filed four years ago that only now appear to be nearing a resolution.

AT&T and T-Mobile are believed to be the last two major US carriers still making use of Carrier IQ's software.

See "AT&T Brings Carrier IQ In-House" - here.